Basketball and Football Winter 2011

20111223:
[20111229]
Basketball:
Daniel Josh Tim Chris Ryan Kevin?

So windy.

Football:
Daniel Josh Tim. Chris Ryan Kevin?.

For ease, Daniel set up four preset plays assigned to the numbers 1 through 4.

20111227:
[20111229]
Football:
Michael Phuong Stephanie 5. Tim Josh Tiffany 7.

Game:
Started late. Played a little past sunset. I recalled the score was 5 to 6 when we were about ready to end the game. But Phuong requested one more possession to tie the game. But our team regained possession. Phuong declared first to score wins. We scored on that possession.

Lost Keys:
Fog was settling. We had to look for Phuong's keys. He had placed them near all the bags which were subsequently moved about ten feet closer to where we were playing. We pooled our light sources and scanned the area as carefully as possible. Occasionally we would search inside Josh's bag for the keys. Ultimately, we ended up finding the keys hanging off the bottom of Josh's bag.

20111228:
[20111229]
Football:
Josh Stephanie Phuong lose?. Tiffany Tim Kevin win?.
Josh Tiffany Phuong 4 or 5. Stephanie Tim Kevin 2.

Rules:
Two-hand touch. 5 downs, no blitzes, 5 alligators must be counted out loud before rushing the QB, QB is allowed to run only if a member of the defense crosses the line of scrimmage. To "punt" is to move the ball half the distance to the goal and obviously a change in possession. "Kick-off" is down at the goal line. Because of the number of players, no hand-offs.

See Touch football (Wikipedia.org)

My Future Proposal of Rules:
Two-hand touch (simultaneous). 5 downs, 1 blitz, 5 alligators must be counted out loud before rushing the QB, QB is allowed to run if a member of the defense crosses the line of scrimmage or after the blitz count (in this case 5 alligators). To "punt" is to move the ball half the distance to the goal and obviously a change in possession. "Kick-off" is down at one-fifth the length of the field. Because of the number of players, no hand-offs, unless for a change in QB. See Forward pass (Wikipedia.org) and Lateral pass (Wikipedia.org).

Clarification of my proposed rule set by examples:
A) The QB hikes the ball. A defender begins counting. 1, 2. The QB hands it off to a teammate. That teammate is now the QB and follows the same rules as the QB. The defender continues counting 3, 4, 5. And may begin to blitz the QB.
B) The QB hikes the ball. A defender begins counting. 1, 2. The QB makes a lateral pass to a teammate. While the teammate may opt for a legal forward pass (one from behind the line of scrimmage) or begin running the ball. The defense may "tackle" the teammate that just received the ball.

Random Comments:
We tried to use the flags, but they broke so easily. I'll have to return them. Eventually we reverted to two-hand touch. In the first game, instead of using numbers, we used names. Bottlecap, Marco, Penguin, Polo. One of the fun plays that almost worked was a lateral pass from Tiffany to me followed by a forward pass to Kevin. I think it confused Josh, because he saw it as a hand-off. In any case, it failed. Later, someone made the later pass to Josh who threw a forward pass to Phuong for a touch-down. Honestly, the play must have confused me as much as it did Josh. In part, because our rules don't explicitly cover the lateral pass. Under the rules we had set, I'd say that Josh would have been allowed to rush me (not having to finish 5 alligators) and vice versa. At some point, we would often employ the strategy of not rushing the QB in favor of adding a defender against the receivers. This gives the defensive team a two-fold advantage of not allowing the QB to run the ball. It was too late then, but I think there should be an option for the QB to count to 10 alligators and running the ball. The plays where the players would cross work well when unexpected, but the defenders could agree ahead of time to switch coverage in such situations. The difficulty is when the switched coverage results in a significant speed difference and therefore a worse scenario than trying to catch-up with the original match-up. One of the problems I ran into was a desire to throw past a tall defender for an easy touchdown, but in hindsight, it would have been more beneficial in the long-run to throw in front of a tall defender. Basically the receiver would probably be down the moment he/she catches the ball, but at least there would be yards gained. We never invoked the option to "punt."

Regarding Field Sizes:
We just sort of gauged field size. But perhaps problematic was unmarked end zones. In a full football game, there are 11 players on each team on a 360 feet by 160 feet field (including end zones). That's about 14.5 feet per person against width and 33 feet per person against length (27 feet per person against length without the end zone). If we scaled the field by number of players on a team then we'd have:

1-on-1 playing on a 33 (27) feet by 15 feet field.
2-on-2 playing on a 66 (54) feet by 29 feet field.
3-on-3 playing on a 99 (81) feet by 44 feet field.
: A tenth of the field is 8.1 feet and each end zone is 9 feet.
4-on-4 playing on a 132 (108) feet by 58 feet field.
8-on-8 playing on a 264 (216) feet by 116 feet field.
11-on-11 playing on a 363 (297) feet by 160 feet field.

Those seem like pretty reasonable size fields. However, perhaps more reasonable and easy to measure out the field, is taking the length (including end zone) to be three times the combined arm spans of all the players on the field. Thus in a 3-on-3 game with average height of 5'6" we'd have an approximate length of 99 feet. Take a fourth of the combined arm spans off from each end to mark the end zones. On a 3-on-3 game with average height of 5'6" we'd have 8'3" long end zones. The width should be one-and-a-half minus one-sixth the combined arm spans of all players on the field. Thus in a 3-on-3 game with average height of 5'6" we'd have an approximate width of 44 feet.

Injury Report:
Jammed metacarpophalangeal joint belonging to the thumb on my right hand. See Finger (Wikipedia.org).

Basketball:
Kevin Phuong Stephanie 11. Tim Josh Tiffany 8.

Handedness:
I throw the foot ball with my right hand. I throw a basketball with my right hand. I throw a baseball with my left hand (thus I wear a baseball glove on my right hand). I hold a badminton racket in my left hand.

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