Drink Young's Double Chocolate Stout

Young's Double Chocolate Stout

I'm pretty sure this is a picture of Young's Double Chocolate.
Due to the foam head and color of the beer.
Relevant Links:
Wells & Young's Website
Young's Double Chocolate Stout (Wells & Young's Website)
Young's Double Chocolate Stout (BeerAdvocate.com)

Yard House:
7.0% Drink Bear Republic Racer 5 IPA
5.2% Drink Hobgoblin English Ale
5.2% Drink Young's Double Chocolate Stout
5.3% Drink Alaskan Amber
9.0% Drink North Coast Old Rasputin Imperial Stout

20110628: [20110704][20150425 Edit]
Ordered a Shorty's (9 oz glass) instead of the standard pint glass (16 oz glass). This way I can try more beers. 3 Shorty's makes for 27 oz, while 2 pint glasses make for 32 oz.

I wrote: "Young's Double Chocolate. The beer has a nice chocolate smell. Actually, it smells a little like salmon. Tasting the beer, I feel like I am drinking chocolate. However, after Josh mentioned coffee, I could sort of detect some coffee notes."
I wrote: "This double chocolate, coffee taste is AWESOME. The taste gets less chocolaty with each sip, but it's still good. By now I don't taste any bitterness. It has a strong chocolate smell. Nearing the bottom of the glass, I can still smell the beer - usually I can no longer smell the scent of a beer when I've drunken that far down the glass."

I don't know if I was imagining the salmon smell, but it definitely tastes like chocolate with a hint of coffee and smells great. In terms of texture, it was creamy and leaning towards being heavy like a glass of Guinness. Overall, it was wonderful. If I were to choose a favorite beer, it'd be in the running.

Apparently I've become rather used to a lot of the bitterness in beer. A friend of mine who doesn't drink that often says she had Young's Double Chocolate before, but mostly tastes the bitterness, whereas my experience on 20110702 involved simply enjoying the flavors. In any case, I apologize if you've been drinking beers which I thought didn't taste bitter, and yet were. In most cases I try to find website information regarding the IBU and other information related to the perceived bitterness, but sometimes, like for Young's Double Chocolate, the official website doesn't provide it.

This picture is what I mean by "near the bottom" in my post.

Yard House:
5.3% Drink Alaskan Amber (SIP)
5.2% Drink Deschutes Black Butte Porter (SHORTY)
6.0% Drink Ballast Point Black Marlin Porter (SHORTY)
5.2% Drink Young's Double Chocolate Stout (SIP)
5.4% Drink Red Nectar (SIP)
4.9% Drink Blue Hawaiian Hefeweizen (SHORTY)

20111221: [20120115]
My friend Michael asked if I wanted to have a sip of his Young's Double Chocolate Stout. I recall telling him I already knew what it tasted like, but if he didn't mind I'd like a sip anyways. Perhaps having a sip of his Young's Double Chocolate is what prompted me to try the two porters (Ballast Point Black Marlin Porter and Deschutes Black Butte Porter).

Website Information:
Young's Double Chocolate Stout

Alcohol strength: 5.2%
Pack format: Bottle

Unsurprisingly for a beer from the Young’s stable, Double Chocolate Stout has been recognised as an award-winning brew on several occasions, including: Brewing Industry International Awards Gold Medal Winner 2000, Silver Medal Winner 2002 and Bronze Medal Winner 1998 and 2004.

Luxurious and at the same time with a hint of decadence, Young’s Double Chocolate Stout has it all, delivering a satisfying, indulgent taste without ever becoming overly sweet.

Pale Ale and Crystal malt, Chocolate Malt, a special blend of sugars, Fuggle and Golding hops, real dark chocolate and chocolate essence are combined to deliver a stout of with real credentials.

Chocolate malt and real dark chocolate are combined with Young’s award winning rich, full flavoured dark beer to craft a satisfyingly indulgent, but never overly sweet experience.

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