Movie The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007)

Watched 20110502 35mm Shriver Hall. French audio with English subtitles.
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007) Julian Schnabel. 112 min [bot memoir Le scaphandre et le papillon (1997) by Jean-Dominique Bauby]
Le scaphandre et le papillon (original title)

Relevant Links:
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (IMDb.com)
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (film) (Wikipedia.org)

20110502:
[20110503]
This movie was great. Many beautiful and creative shots. For example, parts of the film, especially at the beginning, are shot from behind Jean-Do's eyes. When his vision goes hazy, the screen blurs. Sometimes it whites out. Sometimes he loses focus. And so on. While it could make some people cry, I never even got to tear jerk.

This isn't about the film, but about the viewing experience: During the film, the projector bulb went out. I'm not sure if they started the film right where they left off or not. Not a big deal. I think his girlfriend gave him a call, and Marie hung up the phone before the bulb went out. After the movie started again, doctors were surrounding him.

Favorite/Memorable scenes: (Listed as they come to mind)
The character Jean-Do's right eye gets sewn shut.
Jean-Do's dad calls him.
Jean-Do gives his dad a shave.

Credits:
The credits play various avalanches played in reverse. The credits scroll over and are a dark blue, which sometimes is hard to see over the avalanches. At least I think the event taking place in the background are avalanches.

Cast:
Mathieu Amalric, the actor who plays the protagonist in this movie, was the antagonist in Quantum of Solace (2008).

Pondering:
When I first saw the method of communication introduced to Jean-Do, I started thinking about what I would consider. I thought that 2^5 would cover 26 English letters. But it's not good for one eye. With two eyes, you could nicely do left and right winks. Basically you're giving sequences of five for each letter. I suppose you could do left wink, right wink, and blink for 3^3 to cover the 26 letters. You could actually have 3+3^2+3^3=38 letters. Example with the English linotype order: etaoin shrdlu cmfwyp vbgkqj xz. I sort of tried to spread the letters out to hopefully use the left and right eyelids evenly.
L B R
t e a
LL LB LR BL BB BR RL RB RR
u_ s_ r_ i_ o_ n_ d_ h_ l_
BLL BLB BLR BBL BBB BBR BRL BRB BRR
b__ y__ p__ f__ c__ m__ v__ w__ g__
LBL LBB LBR / RBL RBB RBR
___ k__ x__ _ j__ q__ z__
Remark: Technically, on the same row as BLL BLB BLR BBL BBB BBR BRL BRB BRR would be LLL LLB LLR LBL LBB LBR LRL LRB LRR / RLL RLB RLR RBL RBB RBR RRL RRB RRR. But we only needed 5 more characters.
SAY: Hello world, how are you today?
BLINK: RB B RR RR BB BRB BB LR RR RL RB BB BRB R LR B BLB BB LL L BB RL R BLB.
I suppose having a space bar is useful. So shift everything down one... giving Blink to be the space. While this would use less eye movement than sequences of three, it is open to a little more ambiguity. Whereas, using only 3^3, the sequences can be quickly transcribed and a computer can translate the sequences into words. Almost like translating DNA. If one sequence of three was transcribed wrong, it only results in a wrong letter. The transcriber can always expect sequences of three. Sequences of two and one can be reserved for common responses such as Yes/No, try again, etc. In fact, one blink should be used for Yes and two blinks for No. The disadvantage of my method is that it's more tiring for the blinker. It also requires two moving eyelids.

I'm guessing modern technology would be able to trace eye movement and you could look at the letter you want. If this isn't possible yet, it's probably around the corner.

Without this modern technology, I would agree using the method of communication shown to Jean-Do is the way to go.

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