Book Invisible Man

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20100531 pgs S001-021 [Project Gutenberg EBook #5230]
20100601 pgs 021-029 [Project Gutenberg EBook #5230]
20100602 pgs 029-038 [Project Gutenberg EBook #5230]
20100603 pgs 038-043 [Project Gutenberg EBook #5230]
20100604 pgs 043-062 [Project Gutenberg EBook #5230]
20100605 pgs 062-066 [Project Gutenberg EBook #5230]
20100606 pgs 066-074 [Project Gutenberg EBook #5230]
20100607 pgs 074-106F [Project Gutenberg EBook #5230]
The Invisible Man by H. G. Wells
Check out The Invisible Man by H. G. Wells page at Project Gutenberg EBook #5230.

20100531:
[20100601]
CHAPTER THOUGHTS:
CH I
CH II
Mrs. Hall's "might make so bold as to ask..."
The protagonist has an odd character.
CH IV
Starts with "I". Is this the author?
Note: I will put the period inside of quotes for a statement, but I tend to go against convention for a short word or phrase.
End of chapter IV, Cuss's story of the stranger's arm and cuff occurs.
CH V
CH VI

VOCABULARY:
pg 1
portmanteau
(dictionary.com) "Chiefly British. a case or bag to carry clothing in while traveling, esp. a leather trunk or suitcase that opens into two halves."
sovereign
(dictionary.com) a person who has supreme power or authority
lymphatic
(dictionary.com) "(of persons) having the characteristics, as flabbiness or sluggishness, formerly believed to be due to an excess of lymph in the system."
eclat
(dictionary.com) "1.brilliance of success, reputation, etc.: the éclat of a great achievement. 2.showy or elaborate display: a performance of great éclat. 3.acclamation; acclaim."
pg 2
sidelights
"she noticed that he wore big blue spectacles with sidelights"
?
pg 3
brooked
"she said in a voice that brooked no denial"
(dictionary.com) "–verb (used with object) to bear; suffer; tolerate: I will brook no interference."
serviette
(dictionary.com) "–noun Chiefly British. a table napkin."
pg 4
clothes-horse
(dictionary.com) "2.a frame on which to hang wet laundry for drying."
taters
(dictionary.com) "–noun Dialect. potato."
trap
(dictionary.com) "13.Chiefly British. a carriage, esp. a light, two-wheeled one.""
CH II
pg 6
vestiges
"The only light in the room was the red glow from the fire [...] and the scanty vestiges of the day that came in through the door."
(dictionary.com) "3.a very slight trace or amount of something"
pg 8
humbugging
"You're simply humbugging"
context suggests it means to buy time, delaying something
(dictionary.com) "–verb (used without object) 7.to practice humbug. –noun 1.something intended to delude or deceive. 2.the quality of falseness or deception." "v. intr. To practice deception or trickery."
CH III
pg 10
dilettante
"Out he came, not noticing Fearenside's dog, who was sniffing in a dilettante spirit at Hall's legs."
(dictionary.com) "–noun 1.a person who takes up an art, activity, or subject merely for amusement, esp. in a desultory or superficial way; dabbler. 2.a lover of an art or science, esp. of a fine art. –adjective 3.of or pertaining to dilettantes."
pg 11
bungs
"bottles with bungs"
(dictionary.com) "–noun 1.a stopper for the opening of a cask."
chiffonnier
"putting them in rows on the chiffonnier"
(dictionary.com) "–noun 1.a high chest of drawers or bureau, often having a mirror on top. 2.a low bookcase of the English Regency, with grille doors or doorless. 3.a shallow, tall, open piece of furniture, of the 18th century, having shelves for the display of china. Also, chif·fon·nier."
pg 12
hobnails
"There was a noise of hobnails on the bricks in the bar"
(dictionary.com) "–noun 1.a large-headed nail for protecting the soles of heavy boots and shoes.""
pg 13
piebald
(dictionary.com) "–adjective 1.having patches of black and white or of other colors; parti-colored."
CH IV
pg 13
ostentatiously
pg 14
bogies
pg 16
tremulously
imprecation
ammonite
subscription
CH V
pg 19
imprecation
scullery
CH VI
pg 20
jauntily

20100601:
[20100601]
VOCABULARY:
CH VI
pg 22
compliments
"Mr. Hall's compliments and the furniture upstairs was behaving most extraordinary"
gentry
"'You warnt horseshoes for such gentry as he.'"
CH VII
pg 23
resplendent; pique
"some gay young fellows resplendent in black ready-made jackets and pique paper ties [...] joined the group with confused interrogations."
pg 25
vociferous
"There was a conference, and the incredible evidence of a vociferous eye-witness."
pg 27
expostulation
"'I wish you'd keep your fingesr out of my eye,' said the aerial voice, in a tone of savage expostulation."
akimbo
"The suit of clothes, now all unbuttoned and hanging loosely upon its unseen supports, stood up, arms akimbo."

20100602:
[20100602]
CH IX
I like the introduction of this Mr. Thomas Marvel character.
CH X
"Great and strange ideas transcending experience often have less effect upon men and women than smaller, more tangible considerations."
I was confused at the end of this chapter who was who.
CH XI
The start of this chapter suggests that the last chapter is meant to be a little confusing and that this chapter shall clear up the events that were told in the previous chapter.
I like how the author uses the sniffing and sneezing as indicators of the Invisible Man.

VOCABULARY
pg 29
soundest
"They were the soundest boots he had come across for a long time, but too large for him"
pg 30
agrimony
cadging
"I've been cading boots [...] for days."
tramp
"But a gentlemen on tramp sees a thundering lot of his boots."
(dictionary.com)
"–verb (used without object)
1.to tread or walk with a firm, heavy, resounding step.
2.to tread heavily or trample (usually fol. by on or upon): to tramp on a person's toes.
3.to walk steadily; march; trudge.
4.to go on a walking excursion or expedition; hike.
5.to go about as a vagabond or tramp.
6.to make a voyage on a tramp steamer.
–verb (used with object)
7.to tramp or walk heavily or steadily through or over.
8.to traverse on foot: to tramp the streets.
9.to tread or trample underfoot: to tramp grapes.
10.to travel over as a tramp.
11.to run (a ship) as a tramp steamer.
–noun
12.the act of tramping.
13.a firm, heavy, resounding tread.
14.the sound made by such a tread.
15.a long, steady walk; trudge.
16.a walking excursion or expedition; hike.
17.a person who travels on foot from place to place, esp. a vagabond living on occasional Jobs or gifts of money or food.
18.a sexually promiscuous woman; prostitute.
19.a freight vessel that does not run regularly between fixed ports, but takes a cargo wherever shippers desire.Compare cargo liner.
20.a piece of iron affixed to the sole of a shoe.
Origin:
1350–1400; ME trampen to stamp; c. LG trampen; akin to Goth ana-trimpan to press hard upon. See traipse, trample"
raised
"And if you'll believe me, I've raised nothing in the whole blessed country [...] but them."
promiscuous
"But it's just my promiscuous luck."
interlocutor (also on pg 44)
"to look at the boots of his interlocutor with a view to comparisons"
context suggests its a person talking to you
(dictionary.com) "–noun
1.a person who takes part in a conversation or dialogue.
2.the man in the middle of the line of performers in a minstrel troupe, who acts as the announcer and banters with the end men.
3.a person who questions; interrogator."
furze
peewit
"'Peewit,' said a peewit, very remote."
context suggests its some kind of animal
down
"The down was desolate"
context suggests its a field of some kind
pg 31
flint
"'Then I'm going to throw flints at you till you think differently.'"
context suggests its a stone of some kind
'vox et', jabber
"'What! Ain't there any stuff to you. Vox et--what is it?--jabber. Is it that?'"
context suggests 'vox et' means 'what is it?'
pg 33
flabbergasted
CH X
pg 33
impregnably
"having retired impregnably behind the bolts and bars of his own house"
pg 34
"Iping was gay with bunting, and everybody was in gala dress."
whitewash
pg 35
languid, belied
"He lit it clumsily, and folding his arms began to smoke in a languid attitude, an attitude which his occasional glances up the yard altogether belied."
CH XI

20100603:
[20100603]
CHAPTER THOUGHTS:
CH XII
X XI and XII tell somewhat the same portion of the story, but from different viewpoints.
One of the mysteries is who is telling the story. The story is told from a semi-omniscient point of view.
CH XIII

VOCABULARY:
pg 38
sotto voce
"'What the dooce?' exclaimed Henfrey, sotto voce."
(dictionary.com) "–noun
in a low, soft voice so as not to be overheard."
obdurate
"Hall tried to convey everything by grimaces and dumb show, but Mrs. Hall was obdurate."
(dictionary.com) "–adjective
1.unmoved by persuasion, pity, or tender feelings; stubborn; unyielding.
2.stubbornly resistant to moral influence; persistently impenitent: an obdurate sinner."
pg 40
rout
"involved not in a capture, but a rout"
context suggests a rout is a beating
(dictionary.com) "–noun
1.a defeat attended with disorderly flight; dispersal of a defeated force in complete disorder: to put an army to rout; to put reason to rout.
2.any overwhelming defeat: a rout of the home team by the state champions.
3.a tumultuous or disorderly crowd of persons.
4.the rabble or mob.
5.Law. a disturbance of the public peace by three or more persons acting together in a manner that suggests an intention to riot although they do not actually carry out the intention.
6.a large, formal evening party or social gathering.
7.Archaic. a company or band of people."

20100604:
[20100604]
bandying
–verb (used with object)
1.to pass from one to another or back and forth; give and take; trade; exchange: to bandy blows; to bandy words.
2.to throw or strike to and fro or from side to side, as a ball in tennis.
3.to circulate freely: to bandy gossip.
pg 49
anaemic
alternate spelling of anemic
–adjective
1.Pathology. suffering from anemia.
2.lacking power, vigor, vitality, or colorfulness; listless; weak: an anemic effort; anemic tones.
pg 57
ejaculating
"He lit the dining-room lamp, got out a cigar, and began pacing the room, ejaculating."
(dictionary.com)–verb (used with object)
1.to utter suddenly and briefly; exclaim."
pg 58
rent
"He rent the paper open"
pt and pp of rend
rend
(dictionary.com) "–verb (used with object)
1.to separate into parts with force or violence: The storm rent the ship to pieces.
2.to tear apart, split, or divide: a racial problem that is rending the nation.
3.to pull or tear violently (often fol. by away, off, up, etc.).
4.to tear (one's garments or hair) in grief, rage, etc.
5.to disturb (the air) sharply with loud noise.
6.to harrow or distress (the heart) with painful feelings."
pg 58
'cum grano'
google search results in 'cum grano salis' meaning 'with a grain of salt'

20100606:
[20100606]
CHAPTER THOUGHTS:
The Invisible Man gets a name and begins to describe how it all happened. I guess up until now, I was able to go along with the possibility that the Invisible Man had discovered some way to become invisible. But when he started describing it, with what I know to be possible, doesn't make sense. Oh well. It was, at the least, imaginative.

VOCABULARY:
palaeolithic
(dictionary.com)
noun
1.second part of the Stone Age beginning about 750,00 to 500,000 years BC and lasting until the end of the last ice age about 8,500 years BC
pg 70
patois
(dictionary.com)
–noun,pluralpat·ois  [pat-wahz, pah-twahz; Fr. pa-twa]
1.a regional form of a language, esp. of french, differing from the standard, literary form of the language.
2.a rural or provincial form of speech.
3.jargon; cant; argot.
vivisection
(dictionary.com)
–noun
1.the action of cutting into or dissecting a living body.
2.the practice of subjecting living animals to cutting operations, esp. in order to advance physiological and pathological knowledge.
impunity
(dictionary.com)
–noun
1.exemption from punishment.
2.immunity from detrimental effects, as of an action.
CH XXI

20100607:
[20100607]
THOUGHTS:
CH XXII
So close (to being clothed) and yet so far...
The current moral of the story: if you only live in the present, you might get yourself stuck in a rut.
It's a bit of a trade-off, certainly life may be more enjoyable/bearable if you live only focused on the present, but there are times which our actions call for planning.
CH XXIII
The first reference to the Invisible Man in this chapter is not by his name but by Invisible Man.
The lines on pg 85 starting with "Before I made this mad experiment I had dreamt of a thousand advantages. That afternoon it seemed all disappointment..." reflect on the moral I put forth at CH XXII.
Note: like 'spell' with pt. and pp. 'spelled' or 'spelt'), the pt. and pp. of 'dream' is 'dreamed' or 'dreamt.' But the pt. and pp. of 'sleep' is 'slept.'
CH XXV
Tension mounts.
CH XXVI
learnt
Wow...
THE EPILOGUE

VOCABULARY:
CH XXII
pg 77
vociferating
vociferate
"I saw the ugly little Jew of a landlord vociferating in his rooms"
context suggests complaining
(dictionary.com)
–verb (used without object), verb (used with object),-at·ed, -at·ing.
to speak or cry out loudly or noisily; shout; bawl.
pg 78
hallo
"He kept his footing, gave a view hallo, and came up the staircase hot after me."
(dictionary.com)
–interjection
1.(used to call or answer someone, or to incite dogs in hunting.)
–noun
2.the cry “hallo!”
3.a shout of exultation.
–verb (used without object)
4.to call with a loud voice; shout; cry, as after hunting dogs.
–verb (used with object)
5.to incite or chase (something) with shouts and cries of “hallo!”
6.to cry “hallo” to (someone).
7.to shout (something).
Also, halloa, halloo, hallow, hillo, hilloa, hullo, hulloo.
Origin: 1560–70; var. of hollo, itself var. of earlier holla < MF hola, equiv. to ho ahoy + la there
view
(dictionary.com)
18.Fox Hunting. to sight (a fox).
Horseman: View hallo!
Horse: Oh, yes, definitely. A view hallo.
Fox: View hallo?
[The horseman blows a trumpet, causing his dogs to go charge at the Fox.]
Fox: Faith and begora, it's them redcoats again!
Source: Mary Poppins (film) Quotes from http://en.wikiquote.org/

CH XXIII
pg 81
diabolical
"The man must have had diabolically acute hearing."
I recall 'diabol' is the 'devil,' so perhaps 'diabolically' is 'like the devil'
(dictionary.com)
–adjective
1.having the qualities of a devil; devilish; fiendish; outrageously wicked: a diabolic plot.
2.pertaining to or actuated by a devil.
Also, di·a·bol·i·cal.
Origin: 1350–1400; ME diabolik (< MF) < LL diabolicus < Gk diabolikós, equiv. to diábol(os) devil + -ikos -ic
pg 83 and several instances before
hansom
(dictionary.com)
[han-suhm]
–noun
1.a low-hung, two-wheeled, covered vehicle drawn by one horse, for two passengers, with the driver being mounted on an elevated seat behind and the reins running over the roof.
2.any similar horse-drawn vehicle.
Also called hansom cab.
Origin: 1850–55; named after J. A. Hansom (1803–82), English architect who designed it
pg 87
confederate
(dictionary.com)
–noun
3.a person, group, nation, etc., united with others in a confederacy; an ally.
4.an accomplice, esp. in a mischievous or criminal act.
pg 94
contra mundum
"Griffin contra mundum... with a vengeance."
(dictionary.com)
Main Entry: contra mundum
Part of Speech: adv
Definition: lit. against the world; defying or against everyone
Etymology: L.
pg 99
Sidney Cooper
"The pistol snapped its penultimate shot and ripped a valuable Sidney Cooper."
William Sidney Cooper was a painter, so a 'valuable Sidney Cooper' must be a painting of his.

BOOKMARKS
pg 65
tapetum
ta·pe·tum   [tuh-pee-tuhm]
–noun,plural-ta  [-tuh]
1.Botany. a layer of cells often investing the archespore in a developing sporangium and absorbed as the spores mature.
2.Anatomy, Zoology. any of certain membranous layers or layered coverings, as in the choroid of the eyes of certain animals.
Origin:
1705–15; < NL, special use of ML tapētum coverlet (L, only pl.) < Gk tapēt- (s. of tápēs) carpet, rug
pg 71
perambulator
"I staggered out of the way of the cab, avoided a perambulator by a convulsive movement, and found myself behind the hansom."
(dictionary.com)
–noun
1.baby carriage.

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